Dishwasher Maintenance Tips    IMPORTANT:Your dishwasher needs hot water to work. There is a lot of pipe between your water heater and the dishwasher, pipe that is full of room temperature or cooler water. If you simply start up the dishwasher it will draw in all that before the good 'n hot stuff arrives from the water heater. So now you're trying to wash dishes with water somewhere in the 70° range. Sure there's a heater in there but it's going to take some time and the washing has already started. What to do? Simple. Flush out the hot water pipes to get the hot water closer to the dishwasher and ready to go. In 99.9% of homes the water supply for the dishwasher is connected to the hot water supply under the sink. Just run the kitchen faucet until you get hot water there. Now you can wash the dishes with some heat. Dishwasher won't start at all? Make sure the door is closed and latched. Check the breaker. Some homes have a light switch just above the countertop somewhere that turns on and off electricity to the dishwasher. Still won't run? Call me. You can use distilled white vinegar as a rinse agent. Just pour it into the rinse agent reservoir You can clean and freshen the dishwasher by pouring in a cup or two of white vinegar and a cup of baking soda. Just run it empty on normal cycle. The vinegar will help dissolve soap and hard water residue while the baking soda will help eliminate odors. Some people insist the vinegar will ruin seals since it's an acid. I seriously doubt it will do any harm as it will be too diluted to actually damage rubber. I can't tell you how many times I've pulled pieces of broken stemware out of impellers and grinders. This has the potential to block movement of the motor so the dishwasher won't work at all. With the water spraying around forcefully and items banging against each other it really isn't a healthy environment for fragile glassware. So keep washing those wine glasses in the dishwasher and keep my number handy. Or just wash 'em by hand. This tiny glass shard was enough to sieze up the drain pump of a dishwasher. The dime is there just for size reference. Check the spray arms to make sure the little holes aren't blocked. Pieces of eggshell, bits of toothpicks, slivers of plastic wrap, shards of chicken bone, snips of thread, and burnt matches are just a few of the things I've pulled out of spray arms. Remove the spray arm and poke a toothpick or straightened paper clip down in any blocked holes. Shake it around and let the debris fall out. Back flushing with water through the spray holes will help. There is no need to pre-wash dishes before putting them in the dishwasher but you do want to remove any major chunks of food. Finding rust spots on your dishes? If the plastic coating wears off the dish racks there is paint-on repair material available in several colors. Any local appliance parts store will carry it. File, sand, or steel wool off the rust then clean thoroughly before applying the repair. Honestly this is a temporary fix but since those racks often cost as much as a new dishwasher it's worth trying. Getting white spots or a cloudy film left on things? You may be using too much detergent. A rinse agent might be the answer as well. Quite often hard water is an issue with dishwashers not working properly. But do you want to know what the real answer probably is? For environmentalist reasons several states have banned phosphates from detergents. What is a phosphate? They are the magic ingredient that help detergents work. Oversimplification yes, but true. Phosphates keep the gunk in the water from reattaching to your dishes. So what is one to do? You can buy some TSP (TriSodium Phosphate) at your local hardware or plumbing store and mix up your own home brew. Be sure NOT to get the PF version though. PF stands for Phosphate Free. No, I'm not kidding, they truly make the stuff. "I'll have a PB&J sandwich but hold the J.” About a teaspoon of TSP per load should do the trick. I'm told you can find dish detergents with phosphates still in them on the internet but I have no idea of the legal issues involved so don't look to me for links or directions.
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Covering all of South-East Wisconsin including Bayside, Big Bend, Brighton, Bristol, Brookfield, Burlington, Butler, Caledonia, Chenequa, Colgate, Cudahy, Delafield,  Dousman, Eagle, Eagle Lake, Elm Grove, Fox Point, Franklin, Franksville, Genesee, Germantown, Glendale, Greendale, Greenfield, Hales Corners, Hartland, Kenosha,  Lannon, Menomonee Falls, Mequon, Merton, Milwaukee, Mukwanago, Muskego, Nashotah, New Berlin, North Prarie, Oak Creek, Oconomowoc, Ottawa, Paddock Lake, Paris, Pewaukee, Pleasant Prarie, Racine, Raymond, River Hills, Rochester, Salem Oaks, Shorewood, Silver Lake, Somers, South Milwaukee, St. Francis, Sturtevant, Sussex, Thiensville, Union Grove, Vernon, Wales, Waterford, Waukesha, Wauwatosa, West Allis, Whitefish Bay, Wind Lake, Wind Point, and Yorkville Servicing all major brands and models of home appliances including Admiral Repair, Amana Repair, Appliance Repair, Caloric Repair, Cooktop Repair, Dishwasher Repair, Dryer Repair, Electrolux Repair, Freezer Repair, Frigidaire Repair, GE Repair, Garbage Disposer Repair, Hotpoint Repair, Ice Maker Repair, Jenn-Air Repair, Kenmore Repair, Kitchenaid Repair, LG Repair, Magic Chef Repair, Marvel Repair, Maytag Neptune Repair, Maytag Repair, Oven Repair, Range Repair, Refrigerator Repair, Roper Repair, Samsung Repair, Scotsman Repair, SpeedQueen Repair, Stove Repair, Tappan Repair, Washer Repair, Washing Machine Repair, Whirlpool Duet Repair, Whirlpool Repair, White Westinghouse Repair
Dishwasher Maintenance Tips    IMPORTANT:Your dishwasher needs hot water to work. There is a lot of pipe between your water heater and the dishwasher, pipe that is full of room temperature or cooler water. If you simply start up the dishwasher it will draw in all that before the good 'n hot stuff arrives from the water heater. So now you're trying to wash dishes with water somewhere in the 70° range. Sure there's a heater in there but it's going to take some time and the washing has already started. What to do? Simple. Flush out the hot water pipes to get the hot water closer to the dishwasher and ready to go. In 99.9% of homes the water supply for the dishwasher is connected to the hot water supply under the sink. Just run the kitchen faucet until you get hot water there. Now you can wash the dishes with some heat. Dishwasher won't start at all? Make sure the door is closed and latched. Check the breaker. Some homes have a light switch just above the countertop somewhere that turns on and off electricity to the dishwasher. Still won't run? Call me. You can use distilled white vinegar as a rinse agent. Just pour it into the rinse agent reservoir You can clean and freshen the dishwasher by pouring in a cup or two of white vinegar and a cup of baking soda. Just run it empty on normal cycle. The vinegar will help dissolve soap and hard water residue while the baking soda will help eliminate odors. Some people insist the vinegar will ruin seals since it's an acid. I seriously doubt it will do any harm as it will be too diluted to actually damage rubber. I can't tell you how many times I've pulled pieces of broken stemware out of impellers and grinders. This has the potential to block movement of the motor so the dishwasher won't work at all. With the water spraying around forcefully and items banging against each other it really isn't a healthy environment for fragile glassware. So keep washing those wine glasses in the dishwasher and keep my number handy. Or just wash 'em by hand. This tiny glass shard was enough to sieze up the drain pump of a dishwasher. The dime is there just for size reference. Check the spray arms to make sure the little holes aren't blocked. Pieces of eggshell, bits of toothpicks, slivers of plastic wrap, shards of chicken bone, snips of thread, and burnt matches are just a few of the things I've pulled out of spray arms. Remove the spray arm and poke a toothpick or straightened paper clip down in any blocked holes. Shake it around and let the debris fall out. Back flushing with water through the spray holes will help. There is no need to pre-wash dishes before putting them in the dishwasher but you do want to remove any major chunks of food. Finding rust spots on your dishes? If the plastic coating wears off the dish racks there is paint- on repair material available in several colors. Any local appliance parts store will carry it. File, sand, or steel wool off the rust then clean thoroughly before applying the repair. Honestly this is a temporary fix but since those racks often cost as much as a new dishwasher it's worth trying. Getting white spots or a cloudy film left on things? You may be using too much detergent. A rinse agent might be the answer as well. Quite often hard water is an issue with dishwashers not working properly. But do you want to know what the real answer probably is? For environmentalist reasons several states have banned phosphates from detergents. What is a phosphate? They are the magic ingredient that help detergents work. Oversimplification yes, but true. Phosphates keep the gunk in the water from reattaching to your dishes. So what is one to do? You can buy some TSP (TriSodium Phosphate) at your local hardware or plumbing store and mix up your own home brew. Be sure NOT to get the PF version though. PF stands for Phosphate Free. No, I'm not kidding, they truly make the stuff. "I'll have a PB&J sandwich but hold the J.” About a teaspoon of TSP per load should do the trick. I'm told you can find dish detergents with phosphates still in them on the internet but I have no idea of the legal issues involved so don't look to me for links or directions.