Refrigerator Maintenance Tips    At least once a year clean the condenser coils. If you have pets you want to do this twice a year. If you have many pets that shed you might want to do this even more often. You'll need a vacuum cleaner with a hose, a condenser brush available from me or any local appliance parts store, and perhaps a phillips screwdriver or 1/4 or 5/16 nut driver. For refrigerators with the condenser coils underneath you'll have to unsnap the protective grill at the bottom of the front of the fridge. Most just pull off but some models might have a couple screws holding them in. Open the door(s) to make it easier to get at and remove. For refrigerators with the condenser coils in the back you'll need to pull the fridge away from the wall and remove the access panel in back. You'll want to turn off and unplug the fridge first because there are some live wires back there not to mention the fan spinning away waiting for you to get your fingers too close. Now use a condenser brush to loosen the accumulated dust and pull it toward your vacuum cleaner nozzle. You can use the brush attachment for your vacuum to clean the condenser fan and the surrounding area behind the panel in the back. Most condenser fans are plastic so be careful not to crack or break off a fin. Clean the door seals/gaskets using hot soapy water and a soft cloth. Simply open the door and wipe down the seals and the area where the seal contacts the fridge. Spilled food can make these gaskets sticky which may tear them as you open the door. I've seen fridge door seals destroyed by spilled soda or melted popsicle goo cementing the gasket to the frame. If you have kids you know what I'm talking about. Clean the seals once a year or as needed.   BONUS TIP: Wipe down the gaskets with vinegar or a vinegar/water mix to help prevent mildew from forming. Be sure to rinse it off well because vinegar is an acid and might damage some seal materials. Also be careful to dry the seal thoroughly as moisture feeds any mold that might be forming there. Don't let bits of food spill out into your freezer. Inside the back wall of your freezer is the evaporator coil - the source of cooling for the whole unit. Under the evaporator coil is a drip pan with a drain hole. If that hole gets clogged or blocked by frozen peas or corn, by a chunk of pizza crust, or by a scrap of plastic wrap, then the water that drips off the evaporator coil during defrost will just run out into your freezer - and drip down into your fridge section if you have a model with the freezer on top or out onto your floor in side by side and bottom freezer models. Don't super-stuff the fridge or the freezer section. Cold air needs to circulate around the items to keep them at the proper temperature. This is usually more of an issue in the freezer rather than in the fresh food section. Be careful with things like bread and bags of frozen vegetables and similar items that can mold themselves around the other rigid containers thus blocking airflow. If you find items closer to the front are not freezing or are freezing slowly while items in the back are all rock hard you'll want to rearrange things so the air circulation improves. Stinky fridge? Clean it out. Remove everything from the fridge and pull out all the shelving. Use warm soapy water and wipe down everything. Don't forget to clean those shelving panels too. If it has a particularly stubborn odor or is very strong use a highly diluted bleach/water mixture. Also have a look in the freezer for anything open or spilled since the fresh food section gets its cold air from the freezer. Put an open container of baking soda or one of any deodorizers made for use in a refrigerator to help keep the problem from coming back. I've heard good things about activated charcoal but I don't have any experience with it myself so I can't speak to its effectiveness.
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Refrigerator Maintenance Tips    At least once a year clean the condenser coils. If you have pets you want to do this twice a year. If you have many pets that shed you might want to do this even more often. You'll need a vacuum cleaner with a hose, a condenser brush available from me or any local appliance parts store, and perhaps a phillips screwdriver or 1/4 or 5/16 nut driver. For refrigerators with the condenser coils underneath you'll have to unsnap the protective grill at the bottom of the front of the fridge. Most just pull off but some models might have a couple screws holding them in. Open the door(s) to make it easier to get at and remove. For refrigerators with the condenser coils in the back you'll need to pull the fridge away from the wall and remove the access panel in back. You'll want to turn off and unplug the fridge first because there are some live wires back there not to mention the fan spinning away waiting for you to get your fingers too close. Now use a condenser brush to loosen the accumulated dust and pull it toward your vacuum cleaner nozzle. You can use the brush attachment for your vacuum to clean the condenser fan and the surrounding area behind the panel in the back. Most condenser fans are plastic so be careful not to crack or break off a fin. Clean the door seals/gaskets using hot soapy water and a soft cloth. Simply open the door and wipe down the seals and the area where the seal contacts the fridge. Spilled food can make these gaskets sticky which may tear them as you open the door. I've seen fridge door seals destroyed by spilled soda or melted popsicle goo cementing the gasket to the frame. If you have kids you know what I'm talking about. Clean the seals once a year or as needed.   BONUS TIP: Wipe down the gaskets with vinegar or a vinegar/water mix to help prevent mildew from forming. Be sure to rinse it off well because vinegar is an acid and might damage some seal materials. Also be careful to dry the seal thoroughly as moisture feeds any mold that might be forming there. Don't let bits of food spill out into your freezer. Inside the back wall of your freezer is the evaporator coil - the source of cooling for the whole unit. Under the evaporator coil is a drip pan with a drain hole. If that hole gets clogged or blocked by frozen peas or corn, by a chunk of pizza crust, or by a scrap of plastic wrap, then the water that drips off the evaporator coil during defrost will just run out into your freezer - and drip down into your fridge section if you have a model with the freezer on top or out onto your floor in side by side and bottom freezer models. Don't super-stuff the fridge or the freezer section. Cold air needs to circulate around the items to keep them at the proper temperature. This is usually more of an issue in the freezer rather than in the fresh food section. Be careful with things like bread and bags of frozen vegetables and similar items that can mold themselves around the other rigid containers thus blocking airflow. If you find items closer to the front are not freezing or are freezing slowly while items in the back are all rock hard you'll want to rearrange things so the air circulation improves. Stinky fridge? Clean it out. Remove everything from the fridge and pull out all the shelving. Use warm soapy water and wipe down everything. Don't forget to clean those shelving panels too. If it has a particularly stubborn odor or is very strong use a highly diluted bleach/water mixture. Also have a look in the freezer for anything open or spilled since the fresh food section gets its cold air from the freezer. Put an open container of baking soda or one of any deodorizers made for use in a refrigerator to help keep the problem from coming back. I've heard good things about activated charcoal but I don't have any experience with it myself so I can't speak to its effectiveness.